The kingfisher and the fish

Robin Rowland 
A belted kingfisher at the sea dyke, Haisla, BC. May 10, 2024. (Robin Rowland)

The belted kingfisher (Megaceryle alcyon) is often hard to photograph. The bird may perch long enough to catch a couple of shots, then it dives into the water to catch a fish, or flies off to another location to watch for prey.

During the monthly shore bird count in Kitimat and Haisla, one kingfisher remained on an old driftwood stump for more than seven minutes. After a while it was obvious why the kingfisher wasn’t inclined to move. It had a fish cached in another part of the stump.

Belted kingfisher on a driftwood stump at low tide, at Haisla, BC. during the May bird count May 10, 2024 (Robin Rowland)
Belted kingfisher looks around from a driftwood stump at low tide, at Haisla, BC. during the May bird count May 10, 2024 (Robin Rowland)
Belted kingfisher looks around from a driftwood stump at low tide, at Haisla, BC. during the May bird count May 10, 2024 (Robin Rowland)
The kingfisher appears to preen its feathers. (Robin Rowland)
The kingfisher appears to preen its feathers. (Robin Rowland)
The kingfisher flies to another part of the stump. (Robin Rowland)
The kingfisher looks around its cache and pulls out a fish. (Robin Rowland)
The kingfisher looks around its cache. pulls out a fish. (Robin Rowland)
The kingfisher and the fish. (Robin Rowland)
A closer view of the  kingfisher and its fish. (Robin Rowland)
The kingfisher is trying to eat the fish. (Robin Rowland)
The kingfisher is trying to eat the fish. (Robin Rowland)

 

The kngfisher succeeds in swallowing the fish and is on the lookout for new prey. (Robin Rowland)

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